Graphic novel
Przemysław "Trust" Truściński
Andzia

Illustrating poems about a disobedient girl, Trust lets his imagination run wild

One day Andzia saw a kitten
walking by and she was smitten!
As she bent to stroke its fur
Her aunt began to screech at her,
“Leave that little cat alone,
Or it’ll scratch you to the bone!”
But this warning she ignored
Because she was a naughty ward.
The cat swiped at her with its claw
And then the girl began to bawl.
The air filled with her frantic screams
For blood was pouring down in streams.
Then her auntie’s face grew graver
While Andzia cursed the cat’s behaviour.
Andzia’s aunt began to scold:
‘You didn’t heed what you were told!
You’re to blame for your distress
And for the blood now on your dress.
The blame does not lie with the cat
For it’s a scratcher – you knew that!
And furthermore, it’s quite a sin
To curse like that! So don’t begin!
But for your wound, here’s what we’ll do:
I’ve got a cure that’s tried and true.
A good, high-quality band-aid.’
Which Andzia heard as ‘marmalade’,
Because her hearing starts to fail
Whenever Auntie’s scolds prevail.
Through her tears a smile appeared
And then she said, greatly cheered,
‘That’s a cure I never doubt!’
And stuck her little tongue right out.
But her auntie in a flash
Put the band-aid on the gash.
When Andzia saw her auntie’s plan,
Once again, the tears began.
‘Now,’ she thought, ‘I’ll never stop
Until I get a lollipop.’
But her auntie’s remedies
Only came from pharmacies.
‘The only cure,’ her auntie quipped,
‘For naughty kids is to be whipped.’
A bundle of birch twigs appeared:
A remedy most greatly feared.
Dear reader! Would you like to know
The ending of this tale of woe?
It won’t take long to summarize:
Andzia was quick to apologize,
And on her neck the wound soon healed.
Did her auntie start to yield?
Yes! Perceiving the remorse,
She had a change of heart, of course.
She gave her honey, to be nice.
And the kitty caught four mice.

Translated by Scotia Gilroy

Graphic novel
Przemysław "Trust" Truściński
Andzia

Illustrating poems about a disobedient girl, Trust lets his imagination run wild

Publisher: Timof i Cisi Wspólnicy, Warszawa 2020
Translation rights: Timof i Cisi Wspólnicy, timof@timof.pl
Foreign language translations: Rights to Andzia have been sold to France. Przemysław „Trust” Truściński is one of the most important Polish comic artists and illustrators, as well as the originator and the co-organiser of the first comic conventions and festivals in Poland. He created the Geralt character for the cult game „The Witcher”.

The heroine of these peculiar, surprising poems written by Bishop Piotr Mańkowski (1866-1933) is a little girl named Andzia. Breaking the rules dictated by adults, Andzia gets pulled into a maelstrom of extraordinary events. Sometimes a poem ends with merely a harmless reprimand, but other times with dismemberment or a lifelong debt. However, each poem’s ending is more humorous than gruesome. And the lessons that can be learned from them is that while it is safer to listen to your elders, disobedient children have the most wonderful adventures.

The nine poems by Bishop Mańkowski were discovered in Rome in 2007. They were inspired by the work of Heinrich Hoffmann, author of books about ‘Shaggy Peter’ (original: Der Struwwelpeter), who suffered terrible consequences for his unruly behaviour. In Andzia, Mańkowski also polemicises with the moralising works of Stanisław Jachowicz, the most popular Polish fairy tale writer of the 19th century.

Although Mańkowski is not always stylistically perfect, his feel for language cannot be denied. The lively phrasing and regular rhymes make the poems easy to read and quick to memorise. The author’s ingenuity is impressive as he leads Andzia from completely mundane situations into the most surprising and absurd regions of experience.

The poems were illustrated by Przemysław ‘Trust’ Truściński, one of Poland’s most talented comic artists from the generation that debuted in the 1990s. In Trust’s visual interpretation, Andzia is a brave, determined child similar to Little Nemo from Winsor McCay’s famous comics. Just like McCay, Trust lets his imagination run wild – the illustrations sometimes become detached from the text and drift away towards a surreal sequence of associations. However, while Nemo grappled with the oneiric delusions of a child’s imagination, Andzia is surrounded by the delightful technological innovations of the interwar period – automobiles, transatlantic planes, radio transmitters and tanks.

Tomasz Pstrągowski

Translated by Scotia Gilroy

Selected samples

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Jakub Małecki
Wiesław Myśliwski
Elżbieta Cherezińska
אנדז'יי ספקובסקי
Aleksandra Lipczak
Jacek Dukaj
Wit Szostak
Bartosz Biedrzycki
Zyta Rudzka
Maciej Płaza
Wojciech Chmielewski
Paweł Huelle
Przemysław "Trust" Truściński
Angelika Kuźniak
Wojciech Kudyba
Michał Protasiuk
Stanisław Rembek
Rembek
Krzysztof Karasek
Elżbieta Isakiewicz
Artur Daniel Liskowacki
Jarosław Jakubowski
Zbigniew Stawrowski
Szczepan Twardoch
Wojciech Chmielarz
Robert Małecki
Zygmunt Miłoszewski
Anna Piwkowska
Dominika Słowik
Wojciech Chmielewski
Barbara Banaś
Rafał Mikołajczyk
Jerzy Szymik
Waldemar Bawołek
Julia Fiedorczuk
Jakub Szamałek
Witold Szabłowski
Jacek Dukaj
Grzegorz Górny, Janusz Rosikoń
Paweł Piechnik
Andrzej Strumiłło

69

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Urszula Zajączkowska
Marek Stokowski
Stokowski
Hubert Klimko-Dobrzaniecki
HKD
Jakub Małecki
Malecki_Horyzont
Łukasz Orbitowski
Orbitowski
Małgorzata Rejmer
Rejmer
Rafał Wojasiński
Olanda
Wojciech Kudyba
Kudyba
Włodzimierz Bolecki
Bolecki
Jerzy Liebert
Liebert
Wojciech Zembaty
Zembaty
Wojciech Chmielarz
Chmielarz
Bogdan Musiał
Musiał
Joanna Siedlecka
Siedlecka
Krzysztof Tyszka-Drozdowski
Drozdowski
Jarosław Marek Rymkiewicz
Marek Bieńczyk
Bienczyk
Leszek Elektorowicz
Elektorowicz
Adrian Sinkowski
Sinkowski
Szymon Babuchowski
Babuchowski
Lech Majewski
Majewski
Weronika Murek
Murek
Agnieszka Świętek
Swietek
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Barbara Klicka
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Jakub Małecki
Szczepan Twardoch
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Maria Wilczek-Krupa
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Dorota Masłowska
Wiesław Myśliwski
Martyna Bunda
Olga Tokarczuk
Various authors
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Waldemar Bawołek
Marek Oleksicki, Tobiasz Piątkowski
Wojciech Tomczyk
Urszula Zajączkowska
Marzanna Bogumiła Kielar
Ks. Robert Skrzypczak
Bronisław Wildstein
Anna Bikont
Magdalena Grzebałkowska
Wojciech Orliński
Klementyna Suchanow
Andrzej Franaszek
Natalia Budzyńska
Marian Sworzeń
Aleksandra Wójcik, Maciej Zdziarski
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